COMMON 

MISCONCEPTIONS

Students share their experiences navigating common misconceptions in their classes, during their pass times and in the news. 

Facing the Facts 

When Donald Trump was elected the forty-fifth president of the United States on November 8, 2016, Azra was sitting in her living room in North Carolina with her mother and sister. For Azra, it did not feel like much was going to change. It never occurred to her that this election would have a ripple effect and would cause her mother to warn her against wearing her hijab outside of her home or would result in strangers yelling at her to “go back to ISIS” or saying she “shouldn’t be in this country." Having come of age amid the intense Islamophobia that took root in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Azra and other college students like her highlight how they view themselves and their sense of belonging in American society.

 

According to the 2017 Pew Research Center study, 74 percent of Muslim-Americans say Trump is “unfriendly to them” and see his dislike reflected in actions such as the travel ban, which aims for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States”. In this study 86 percent of U.S. Muslims said the President made them feel worried, a sharp rise from a survey in 2011, where 24 percent of U.S. Muslims said they were “dissatisfied” with Barak Obama as President. 

your

brand

READ MORE

Facing the Facts 

When Donald Trump was elected the forty-fifth president of the United States on November 8, 2016, Azra was sitting in her living room in North Carolina with her mother and sister.[1] For Azra, it did not feel like much was going to change. It never occurred to her that this election would have a ripple effect and would cause her mother to warn her against wearing her hijaboutside of her home or would result in strangers yelling at her to “go back to ISIS” or saying she “shouldn’t be in this country” (PI 6/20/19). Having come of age amid the intense Islamophobia that took root in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, Azra and other college students like her highlight how they view themselves and their sense of belonging in American society. According to the 2017 Pew Research Center study, 74 percent of Muslim-Americans say Trump is “unfriendly to them” and see his dislike reflected in actions such as the travel ban, which aims for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States” (“U.S. Muslims”). In this study 86 percent of U.S. Muslims said the President made them feel worried, a sharp rise from a survey in 2011, where 24 percent of U.S. Muslims said they were “dissatisfied” with Barak Obama as President (“U.S. Muslims”). 

14991234_10154180681748215_8465886366061
14633163_694795060678078_717040150067504

I'm a paragraph. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It's easy.

Facing the Facts 

“He scares me,” said his mother Denvider Kaur in a shaky voice. “I prayed and prayed that he would change his mind. But he has not.” 

 

His father, Kulpret, agreed that the career can be daunting. He said his son is his hero for the path he has chosen. 

 

“It's pretty amazing to me as a dad and it’s a very proud moment. And I don't mean that just because he’s my son,” said Kulpret. “I think any officer, any young man or woman that feels called into this field, their putting their life on the line for the sake of other people and to make other people’s life better.”

 

Despite his parent’s fears, HarAmrit knows that he wants to live out the Chapel Hill Police Department's motto to “serve, protect and partner,” a characteristic he believes derives from his religion and upbringing. 

 

“In India, the Sikhs looked after everyone,” said HarAmrit. “I want to carry that over in whatever capacity I can here [in the U.S.].” 

Heading 2

Track Name

“He scares me,” said his mother Denvider Kaur in a shaky voice. “I prayed and prayed that he would change his mind. But he has not.” 

 

His father, Kulpret, agreed that the career can be daunting. He said his son is his hero for the path he has chosen. 

 

“It's pretty amazing to me as a dad and it’s a very proud moment. And I don't mean that just because he’s my son,” said Kulpret. “I think any officer, any young man or woman that feels called into this field, their putting their life on the line for the sake of other people and to make other people’s life better.”

 

Despite his parent’s fears, HarAmrit knows that he wants to live out the Chapel Hill Police Department's motto to “serve, protect and partner,” a characteristic he believes derives from his religion and upbringing. 

 

“In India, the Sikhs looked after everyone,” said HarAmrit. “I want to carry that over in whatever capacity I can here [in the U.S.].”